--> Car That Can Fly Away Developed in Van Nuys

Unveiled - May, 1973 pg.2

1973 Intro

From: The Van Nuys News May 15, 1973

GROUND-AIR VEHICLE

Car That Can Fly Away
Developed in Van Nuys

The AVE Mizar, a combined vehicle and aircraft, was unveiled last week at Van Nuys Airport prior to the vehicle being taken to Pt. Mugu for flight testing.

Developed by Advanced Vehicle Engineers, 7120 Hayvenhurst Ave., this new transportation concept integrates the airframe and pusher-type aircraft engine of a Cessna Skymaster with a modified Ford Pinto.


DISCONNECTING- modified Pinto from AVE Mizar airframe, officials demonstrate ease of operation after taxi test at Van Nuys Airport. Placing wing support in position from left are Henry A. Schroeder and Hal Blake.

Testing Set

For the past two months, the Mizar has been undergoing ground and taxi testing at Van Nuys Airport.

Regulations of the Federal Aviation Administration, however, prohibit flight testing at a metropolitan airport, and the vehicle will go to Pt. Mugu for the flight test program leading to FAA certification.

Designed to provide door-to-door transportation, the AVE Mizar automobile is driven from the home to the airport where it is connected to the AVE Mizar airframe. This is accomplished in less than two minutes by backing the auto under the wings of the airframe where a self-aligning track automatically guides it into locking position.

Instruments in Car

Automobile and airframe are structurally mated by self-locking high strength pins in the support connections. All flight controls and instruments are united by an umbilical type connection.

The licensed pilot, using the auto engine, taxis the Mizar to the end of the runway. The aircraft engine is then started and checked for pre-flight. Both auto and aircraft engines can be used together for a short take-off roll. The aircraft engine alone, however, provides sufficient power for take-off.

Instruments for flight control are incorporated into the dash panel of the Mizar automobile. Instruments air speed and rate of climb indicators, altimeter, directional gyro, standard fuel pressure gauges, throttle, flap switch, trim tab and radio navigational equipment.

The steering column of the Mizar auto has been modified so that the ailerons on the airframe are controlled by turning the wheel right or left, and the elevator by pushing or pulling the steering column in or out.

Easy to Disengage

With a cruising speed over 130 mph, the AVE Mizar has a range in excess of 1000 miles, and a service ceiling of 12,000 feet. Retractable rudder pedals are mounted under the steering column. Touching down on the four wheels and using four-wheel braking the Mizar can stop within 530 feet.

After taxiing to the tie-down area, the Mizar airframe is easily disengaged from the Mizar automobile, and held upright by light-weight telescopic supports under each wing. The Mizar auto then is ready to take the businessman to his meeting, a family of four on an outing, or a fishing foursome on a drive to a remote mountain lake.

According to Henry A. Smolinski, founder and president of Advanced Vehicle Engineers, the AVE Mizar has been in design and development for the past 5 years. Three models are to be produced with basic prices ranging from $18,300 to $28,058. Both the AVE Mizar airframe and the AVE automobile, components currently produced by existing manufactures, can be purchased separately.

Smolinski is a graduate of Northrop Institute of Technology's aeronautical engineering school. His aeronautical career began in 1953 when he joined North American Aviation as a structural engineer working with jet engine and aircraft design. In 1959, he joined Rocketdyne as a project engineer, assigned to missile development and aerospace programs.

AVE was founded in 1968.

Smolinski resides in Simi Valley.

One of the Founders

An attractive blond pilot, Lois A. McDonald of Santa Susana, is one of the three test pilots for the AVE Mizar.

In addition to being a test pilot, Ms. McDonald serves as vice president of Advanced Vehicles Engineers and is one of the founding directors of the company.

Ms. McDonald's flight training began in 1967 in an Aeronea Champ at Santa Susana Airport, she has logged more than 900 hours and is rated for all single engine aircraft.

Following initial FAA evaluation, the AVE Mizar prototype will begin a year-long tour of 40 major cities in the United States to demonstrate the vehicle.Three additional units, presently being assembled will be used to complete the FAA flight certification program.

Advanced Vehicle Engineers plans to set up an assembly plant in Southern California. Existing manufactures will be contracted with for Mizar components.

Galpin Ford, located at 15305 Roscoe Blvd., Sepulveda, is the national distributor for the Mizar, and is in the process of scouting up dealerships throughout the United States.

Picture 1 - DISCONNECTING modified Pinto from AVE Mizar airframe, officials demonstrate ease of operation after taxi test at Van Nuys Airport. Placing wing support in position from left are Henry A Smolinski and Hal Blake.

Picture 2 - DOOR-TO-DOOR vehicle sits on runway in Van Nuys prior to shipment to Pt. Mugu for flight testing. AVE Mizar integrates air frame, pusher type Cessna Skymaster engine with modified Ford Pinto.


DOOR-TO-DOOR-vehicle sits on runway in Van Nuys prior to shipment to Pt. Mugu for flight testing. AVE Mizar integrates air frame, pusher type Cessna Skymaster engine with modified Ford Pinto.

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